Politicians just do not understand ‘no’

Posted
No, No and No

I have a small dome shaped object that plays “no” in about a dozen ways.  The last verse states “what part of no don’t you understand?”  And that’s how I feel about several issues rearing their ugly head these days in our communities.

For Openers

What part of “no” does the Thornton City Council not understand? Here they are considering a question in the November election that would allow for council members to serve three concurrent consecutive terms on the council.

At the present time, they are limited to two consecutive 4-year terms.

Evidently the proposal is similar to a question that was on the ballot and soundly defeated by the Thornton voters in 2005.

Why can’t elected officials abide by what the citizens want and by a 75.3 percent vote they soundly voted the measure down. 

Mayor Heidi Williams is touting it as a way for Thornton to align itself with Adams County, which has three-term limits. I go right back to the “no” button and remind the citizens that some elected officials would accept a perpetual appointment if they could get that passed.

Folks, don’t fall for the joint long-range planning hoax. They can plan just as well under the eight-year term limit that they now have.

Through the years my thinking has evolved into being in favor of the eight-year limit.  Honestly, if they can’t get the job done in eight years, and if they need more time, than maybe the city needs a new council.

Over Northglenn Way

Yup, Northglenn City Council members had a change of heart and reneged on the limitations. They were preparing for where locations for open house and garage sale signs can be placed. After some real estate folks objected to the matter, the council turned tail and nixed the idea. Amazing what a few comments from the real estate folks had the council give up on the idea. Once again, the “no” button was activated.

A Real Concern

In 1911 when the City of Westminster was formed, the council wisely decided to make it a non-partisan election. Under that rule council candidates must run for office without declaring a political party to run on.

But does that mean a clear “no” to partisan politics for the council candidates?  Of course not! 

Right now as you read this column, the political ducks are paddling like heck under the non-partisan status banner while working like crazy to get candidates who are being courted by party officials and term-limited councilors. 

It is so downright disgusting to see our non-partisan statues being eroded by ugly partisan underground politics.

It makes me sick to learn of the behind-the-scenes efforts that are being practiced.  If this practice is not stopped immediately, I for one will not support these people. Our best form of government has stood the test of time since 1911 and it should continue.

Right now I ask council and mayoral candidates to pledge to run as an unaffiliated candidate — and if they won’t do that — then maybe we don’t need them representing us on city council. 

This matter crops up every city council election cycle and it’s got to stop.

Folks, pass the “no” button right now and let’s find out whose horse is being ridden.

Quote of the week

“No, no and No!”

Stay well, stay involved and stay tuned ...

Vi June is past Democratic state representative for House District 35. She is a former mayor of Westminster and a former newspaper publisher. A Westminster resident for more than four decades, she and her husband, Bob, have five grown children and eight grandchildren.

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