Book events are perfect for waning days of winter

First-time festival in Denver will bring together exhibitors, speakers

Posted 2/20/18

It’s an active season in the publishing world as well as a great time of year to curl up with a new book or old favorite — and/or, most especially, to read aloud to children — and each other. …

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Book events are perfect for waning days of winter

First-time festival in Denver will bring together exhibitors, speakers

Posted

It’s an active season in the publishing world as well as a great time of year to curl up with a new book or old favorite — and/or, most especially, to read aloud to children — and each other.

• On Feb. 12, readers and writers gathered at Tattered Cover Aspen Grove to hear best-selling author Peter Heller offer a relaxed, humorous talk about “Celine,” a mystery based on his mother, who was a private investigator. He read several passages, including the opening lines that set the scene. It has just been published in paperback, as are his novels, “Dog Star” and “Painter.” He answered questions about his process in storytelling. (“I start with the first line …”)

Heller will also be a keynote speaker at the upcoming — and impressive — March 3 Colorado Book Festival, to be held at Denver Central Library, with program chaired by well-known Castle Rock nature writer Mary Taylor Young. (More information below.)

• Also tempting for the bookish among us will be the Littleton Friends of the Library/Museum’s 2018 Silent Auction, which runs March 3-31 at Bemis Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Chairman Sue McNamee comments that this is the “quiet” sale: no tables of holiday books or bags to fill with Western Welcome Week books

• • •

“Instead,” she says, “we offer 24 `special’ books (and other items) in two glass cases. We display 12 books for the first two weeks, (auction ending March 17) and the next 12 books are displayed through the end of the auction, March 31. Four of the more special items will be exhibited, and bidding will continue, for the entire four weeks.” Also — there’s a 55-book set of “Harvard Classics,” which have been said to offer an education if read for 15 minutes every day. A FOL/M cashier will often be present with a notebook that holds more details about each volume, with photos—and that person will have a key for those who wish to inspect more closely. (Notebook will be at the circulation desk when volunteers are not present.) McNamee encourages bidders to check back frequently to see if someone has outbid you — and of course, she hopes you’ll raise your bid!

A partial list of items available: A signed first edition of the 25th-anniversary edition (1994) of Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five (or The Children’s Crusade).” As new with fine dust jacket. The final two children’s books written by Littleton’s beloved author and storyteller, Caroline Stutson, who passed away in June 2015. “Blue Corn Soup” and “My Family, Four Floors Up” were published posthumously and donated by Al Stutson, a FOL/M board member. Three oversized photography books, offered separately: “Pilgrimage,” by Annie Liebowitz (1st. ed. 2011). “American Places” with photos by Eliot Porter (1st ed. 1981), with script by Pulitzer Prize winner Wallace Stegner and his son, Page Stegner. Leatherbound copy of “Aftermath: Unseen 911 Photographs By A New York Cop.” (1st ed. 2006). Stop by the cases near the entrance to admire these and other goodies. “Bid early and often!” Proceeds support programs at the Littleton Library and Museum.

● Colorado Book Festival — March 3, Denver Central Library 10 W. 14th Ave., Denver. An all-day free festival and exhibit. Program chair Mary Taylor Bradford, Castle Rock nature writer, will moderate a panel about “Communicating Climate Change.” This first-time festival, with 100 exhibitors and an all-day schedule of expert speakers, is being put on by the Colorado Authors League and the Denver Public Library, with expectations of becoming a national caliber book festival, comparable to those in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Atlanta, according to Bradford, who hopes area readers and authors will support this initial well-organized effort.

At the 11 a.m. opening keynote, Peter Heller will be interviewed by journalist Carol McKinley about his creative process and more. Followed by multiple sessions, in multiple rooms: books about food and cooking; children’s lit; cultivating community; history; fiction; “Writing for Chicks”; “Writing for Dudes”; Graphics: reading and writing; Mysteries; Danger, Doom and Destruction — Why do we love them? — and much more. There is a special focus on supporting book clubs, with a session devoted to them — and keeping them on track. The closing keynote session will be by Patricia Limerick, Colorado state historian and faculty director and chair of CU’s Center of the American West, who will be interviewed by historian and author Richard K. Young about her book “The Legacy of Conquest,” on its 30th anniversary.

For information and schedule: COBookFestival.com.

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