Butterfly Pavilion opens naming contest for octopus

5 best names go to public vote April 30 to May 3

Staff report
Posted 4/23/18

The newest invertebrate at Butterfly Pavilion needs a name. The Westminster-based zoo is asking visitors to submit a name for its Octopus vulgaris, better known as the common octopus, through April …

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Butterfly Pavilion opens naming contest for octopus

5 best names go to public vote April 30 to May 3

Posted

The newest invertebrate at Butterfly Pavilion needs a name.

The Westminster-based zoo is asking visitors to submit a name for its Octopus vulgaris, better known as the common octopus, through April 28.

The top five names will be put to a public vote from April 30 to May 3. The winning name will be revealed during the Butterfly Pavilion’s May the Fourth celebration May 4. The winner will get a family membership and a behind-the-scenes tour of the zoo.

The new cephalopod (invertebrates in the squid/octopus family) is from the Florida Keys, but others can be found throughout tropical and sub-tropical areas of the Atlantic Ocean, said a news release from the Butterfly Pavilion.

With an average lifespan of 1-2 years and ranging in size from 12-36 inches and 6 ½ to 22 pounds, these octopuses are famous for the way the defend themselves in the wild - they create a thick cloud of ink that can dull a predator’s sense of smell and allow the octopus to get away. They are also known for their intelligence and even collect shells to decorate their dens knowns as octopus gardens.

“People are able to relate to octopuses in a way that is unrivaled by any other invertebrate,” Butterfly Pavilion aquarist Sara Stevens said in the release. “Due to their intelligence and almost childlike way in which octopuses interact with the world, our guests seem to connect and fall in love with them very easily. It’s an animal that instantly creates a sense of awe and wonder, making them fun and important ambassadors for ocean conservation.”

Find out about visiting the Butterfly Pavilion by calling 303-469-5441 or going to www.butterflies.org.

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