election 2017

Northglenn, Thornton races remain tight as ballot count continues

Two vote difference could send Northglenn seat into recount

Scott Taylor
Posted 11/8/17

 City Council races in Northglenn and Thornton may be close, but neither looks to trigger a ballot-confirming recount, according to Adams County Clerk and Recorder's Public Information …

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election 2017

Northglenn, Thornton races remain tight as ballot count continues

Two vote difference could send Northglenn seat into recount

Posted

City Council races in Northglenn and Thornton may be close, but neither looks to trigger a ballot-confirming recount, according to Adams County Clerk and Recorder's Public Information officer.

That could change within the week, however, according to Adams County's Madison Andersen. The county is still collecting ballots from Colorado's military voters stationed away from home and double-checking others with mismatched signatures.

“We also had a ballot exchange (Wednesday) with our neighboring counties — Weld County, Broomfield, Jeffco, Arapahoe and Denver,” she said. “We met with them to get the ballots they received that were ours. We'll run those through today, too.”

Anderson said the counting is scheduled to be finished eight days after the election: Nov. 15, 2017.

Anderson said the trigger is calculated by dividing the margin between the two candidates by the number of votes given to the winner. Andersen said the results have to be within one-half of one percent to trigger an automatic recount.

In Thornton, incumbent City Councilor Jannifer Kulmann leads opponent Suzanne Brundage by 42 votes out of 6,276 votes cast, as the most recent tally — at 4: 49 p.m. Nov. 8.

Using the county's formula, Brundage would need to get 27 more votes to trigger a recount.

The race in Northglenn for the Ward 2 seat is even closer. Current Mayor Joyce Downing leads opponent Danielle Henry by five votes out of 1,279 ballots cast.

Under the county's formula, Henry would need gain on Downing by two votes to trigger a recount.

Neither is close enough to trigger an automatic recount as it stands, Anderson said, but that can change.

“We are monitoring it very closely,” she said. “Right now, while those races are very close, they are just above the threshold.”

If the results do get close enough to trigger a recount, the city would pay for it, she said.

Andersen said the losing candidates in either race can call for a recount once the tally is final but they would have to pay for it up front.

“They have to pay for it,” she said. “We'd give them an estimate and then they pay us. If the results are different, meaning they won, they would get their money back. If the winner stays the same, they don't get their money back. And that just lets us cover costs.”

Andersen said the cost is determined by the number of ballots in the race.

“It's going to depend on the race,” she said. “We'd figure it out and go back through all of our batches to find the ballots cast for that particular race. It's something we can do, but it's going to take some time.”

 

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