Approving the pipeline is warranted

Bill Christopher
Posted 2/12/14

Enough already! The Keystone Pipeline Project should have been previously approved by President Barack Obama. The 875-mile pipeline, which would cross three states, would transport crude oil from Canadian tar sands to refining facilities on the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2022-2023 of $50 or more, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Approving the pipeline is warranted

Posted

Enough already! The Keystone Pipeline Project should have been previously approved by President Barack Obama. The 875-mile pipeline, which would cross three states, would transport crude oil from Canadian tar sands to refining facilities on the Texas coast. It would further assure less dependence on Middle East crude oil as the U.S. further ramps up with domestic oil production. This is a “good thing” especially given the unrest in the Middle East, and it would strengthen our relationship with Canada. Unfortunately, the Keystone project has been a “political football” with environmental interests whispering in Obama’s ear.

Support for the pipeline

But things have changed. The state department recently gave the project the “green light” after a thorough review. And now, former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, who worked for the president, has publicly endorsed the project. What else do you want Mr. President — should the Pope bless it as well? While Salazar’s department was not responsible for the handling of the pipeline project, he toed the line alongside the president opposing the project. Now, that he is not “connected” to the White House, he has come out in favor of the project. So, “let’s move it, move it, move it.”

Packing heat

The “wild, wild West” is still with us here in Colorado. If you have been following the activity involving the Castle Rock Town Council, you would be aware that their Mayor Paul Donahue brought back the issue of “open carry” (of firearms) at city owned facilities and sites. The existing ordinance gave the town manager the authority to decide where gun owners could “open carry” on city property. I can see why he supports the new ordinance to allow “open carry” at all city properties and buildings. He wants off the hot seat and I don’t blame him! Such highly emotional and controversial issues should be decided by elected officials.

More Amendment 2 argument

In spite of recommendations to leave the existing law in place by the police chief, police department, city employees, the town’s public service commission and polarized public testimony on both side of the issue, the town board voted 4-3 to allow carrying guns on all town properties.

Once again, I am thankful that the Westminster City Council is thoughtful and not going off the deep end to adopt such extreme policies. Under state law, municipalities can ban “open carry” on public property. Guns, hidden or in the open, don’t belong in City Hall, recreation/fitness centers, golf courses, parks, senior centers, libraries, police stations or on trails. I’m glad to live in Westminster and not Castle Rock!

A good idea

A good idea is winding its way through the current legislative session at the Gold Dome. A bill would allow Colorado community colleges to grant a limited number of four-year degrees. The focus would be on granting a four-year bachelor of applied science degree which would be tailored more toward specific technical and career paths. The community colleges would not be allowed to grant four-year bachelor of arts or science degrees. This is a good initial expansion for our community colleges which are spread around the state and offer a lower cost to attend college. I am glad to see that this time around CU, CSU and other 4-year colleges/universities are not opposing this practical idea. Let’s get the bill to the guv.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.