Broomfield pumps the brakes on parkway

Three-way partnership appears shaky

Posted 8/7/19
The Jefferson Parkway Public Highway Authority (JPPHA) planned to break ground on its proposed tollway next year, using a requested $7.5 million total from its three government members to finish the …

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Broomfield pumps the brakes on parkway

Three-way partnership appears shaky

Posted

The Jefferson Parkway Public Highway Authority (JPPHA) planned to break ground on its proposed tollway next year, using a requested $7.5 million total from its three government members to finish the design and contract approval process, according to JPPHA Executive Director Bill Ray.

MORE: Who's in the running to build and run the parkway?

Jefferson County included its $2.5 million in its 2019 budget, and Arvada approved its $2.5 million in April on a 5-1 vote. Broomfield’s decision is pending, however, a discussion and vote is tentatively scheduled for Sept. 10.

If Broomfield decides not to fund the $2.5 million, the JPPHA’s board of directors will determine the next step going forward, Ray said in an email, because it “will mean a fundamental shift in the existing JPPHA relationship among the three member governments.”

The topic was brought up among Broomfield City Councilmembers during a study session discussion on June 18 regarding Rocky Flats and the parkway.

Sometimes it’s hard to discern what people’s main concerns are — the roadway or the health aspects related to its proximity to Rocky Flats, said Councilmember Mike Shelton.

Though much of the conversation was about the safety risks of potential contamination from the former nuclear weapons plant, Broomfield City and County Manager Charles Ozaki pointed out that there’s additional information related to prior commitments to the Jefferson Parkway that Broomfield’s leadership needs to consider.

“This conversation tonight is just part of the reason why we shouldn’t move forward with the Jefferson Parkway,” Councilmember Deven Shaff said at the June 18 meeting. “There are economic reasons, there are environmental reasons. The list goes on.”

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