Community Reach hosts Mental Health classes

Center schedules free first aid programs in Broomfield, Westminster locations

Staff Report
Posted 1/8/20

An effort to teach some basic mental skills to help family, friends, co-workers and peers identify problems continues with two free courses, Jan. 17 and 22. The Community Reach Center offer two …

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Community Reach hosts Mental Health classes

Center schedules free first aid programs in Broomfield, Westminster locations

Posted

An effort to teach some basic mental skills to help family, friends, co-workers and peers identify problems continues with two free courses, Jan. 17 and 22.

The Community Reach Center offer two courses in January designed to give people the skills to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

The center offers one class from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 17 at their Broomfield location, 101 Spader Way 80020.

Second class is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 22 at the Adams Count Human Services Building, 11860 Pecos St. in Westminster.

To register, visit the Community Reach Center website at www.communityreachcenter.org under the “Resources and Mental Health First Aid” heading.

The program is an extension of an idea that began in Australia in 2001, treating mental health training the way we treat general first aid. The idea is that everyone should know the basics -- especially when to recommend someone seek professional help and where to seek that help.

Mental Health First Aiders learn a five-step action plan, known as ALGEE, that includes assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting the individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other supports.

The training helps a person assist someone experiencing a mental health crisis, such as contemplating suicide, with the goal to help support an individual until appropriate professional help arrives. It teaches risk factors and warning signs of mental health and substance use concerns, strategies for how to help someone in both crisis and non-crisis situations, and where to turn for help. 

Those who become trained in MHFA learn how to help family members, friends, co-workers, peers and themselves.

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