Northglenn establishes Police Advisory Board

Group to provide with input on policies and tactics

Liam Adams
ladams@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 12/15/20

Northglenn City Council unanimously voted to establish a police advisory board at a Dec. 14 meeting. The vote follows nationwide protests over police brutality and a third-party review of Northglenn …

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Northglenn establishes Police Advisory Board

Group to provide with input on policies and tactics

Posted

Northglenn City Council unanimously voted to establish a police advisory board at a Dec. 14 meeting.

The vote follows nationwide protests over police brutality and a third-party review of Northglenn police. The board, which will include residents and other community members, will provide the Northglenn Police Department with input.

The advisory board “is about making sure the voice of the community is heard and that the community knows what officers are doing and why they do what they do,” said Councilman Randall Peterson. In an informal vote at the Dec. 14 council meeting, a majority of councilors selected Peterson as council's ex-officio liaison to the board.

Along with Peterson, the board will include four ward-specific residents, two at-large residents, one at-large youth representative, a police union representative, a Northglenn Police Department staff member, a North Metro Fire Rescue District representative and three at-large representatives from community service providers.

The group's larger goals are to improve relationships between community members and the police, ensure that NPD is more transparent about its policies, and give residents more say, “in shaping the vision for public safety,” according to the resolution council approved. One goal is “improved racial/diversity equity,” the resolution reads.

The board can offer input on the department's strategic plan, hiring policies and use of force tactics, said city spokesperson Diana Wilson. It's intended to be proactive, but it might have authority to respond to specific incidents involving police officers.

Referring to Black Lives Matter protests this year, Councilwoman Julie Duran Mullica said, “The movement that we've seen across this country, the movement that we have seen in this state, the movement that we have seen in our community, this is the outcome of that movement.”

The advisory board has been years in the making. In 2017, Northglenn police shot two people accused of stealing a car. One of the two, Jeremy Patscheck, died and the second, Serina Minella, became paralyzed for life. The Adams County District Attorney's office cleared the four officers involved of wrongdoing, according to the Denver Post. Last year, the city agreed to an $8.75 million settlement with the victims' families. After, the city hired consultant BerryDunn to audit NPD. BerryDunn filed its 391-page report in July, which included a recommendation to form an advisory board.

Wilson said the city laid the groundwork for the advisory board —such as the BerryDunn audit — before protests erupted over the death of George Floyd, a Black man, at the hands of white police officers in Minneapolis.

The next step for the advisory board is to select its members. The chief of police will recommend the community safety representatives, which the council will approve. City councilors will select a resident from their respective wards and recommend other residents for the at-large positions. Peterson and Mayor Meredith Leighty will interview and select the at-large resident positions, an at-large youth representative and the community service provider representatives.

The city is accepting applications for the board until Jan. 15. For more information, visit www.northglenn.org/ccppboard.

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