Outdoor and online farmers markets ongoing in Arvada

Market at McIlvoy Park opened June 7

Casey Van Divier
cvandivier@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 6/9/20

When the Arvada Farmers Market opened June 7 after almost three months of pandemic-related regulations, residents like Rebeccah Basell and Lowell Glovesky —who moved to Arvada six months ago partly …

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Outdoor and online farmers markets ongoing in Arvada

Market at McIlvoy Park opened June 7

Posted

When the Arvada Farmers Market opened June 7 after almost three months of pandemic-related regulations, residents like Rebeccah Basell and Lowell Glovesky —who moved to Arvada six months ago partly because it has so many community events — said the modified market was a welcome arrival.

“Fantastic events like this are what make Arvada special,” Basell said. “I’m so happy to be out and I’m more happy this is being done in a responsible way. Everyone seems to be really respectful of the distancing.”

Run by company Edible Market, the Arvada Farmers Market is a staple summer activity for many residents — and though it can’t run exactly as it has in previous years, the company has found other ways to make sure several types of farmers market experiences are available to customers during the pandemic.

Closest to the traditional experience is the outdoor farmers market, which has been relocated to McIlvoy Park this year to promote physical distancing. The market will run on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. through Sept. 27.

In addition to the new location, visitors and vendors wore masks and sanitized their spaces consistently to prevent the spread of the virus.

Like customers, vendors agreed that all in attendance were doing well on staying at least six feet from one another. They were also pleasantly surprised at the turnout on the market’s first day.

“It’s great to see how many people want to come out and support us,” said Lesley Mortimer with Healthy by Design, which brought several jarred products including their latest, Ghostly Fire Pickles, to the market.

Mark Albrecht with Cream City Market, a Wisconsin cheese curd company, highlighted the fact that for many vendors, farmers markets are their main source of income — making it even more of a relief that the market was able to open this summer.

“I’m thanking everyone for being here, and then they’re thanking me for being here,” he said.

But for those who aren’t ready for the outdoor market, throughout the pandemic, Edible Market has been running a virtual market through its website. The option sees a team of contractors work together to prepare hundreds of orders — up to 300 most weeks — for delivery or pickup on Saturdays.

Though the virtual experience has actually been part of the market for years, it became extremely popular only as the pandemic arrived, said Nathan Mudd, who runs the market with his wife Kimberly.

The team of about 15 to 20 individuals drives a route in the area to drop off boxes of produce and residents’ favorite products, which can range anywhere from about $12 to $250, said Nicole Plante, a vendor with the market who is taking the year off this year.

Meanwhile, others stay at Bromley Farm in Brighton as customers drive in for pickup.

“It’s important they’re allowing a way for people to eat healthy and local during all this,” said Anna Frie, another vendor who helps with the pickup and delivery process.

Plante agreed.

“We got a comment from people who are immunocompromised. For them, even the grocery store is not an option,” she said. “This has had an incredible impact on their life, so it’s pretty cool.”

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