Thornton approves miniature goats pilot program

Luke Zarzecki
lzarzecki@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 5/16/22

Starting June 1, Thornton residents will be allowed to keep miniature goals in backyards of single-family detached dwellings after Thornton City Council voted unanimously for the pilot program on May …

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Thornton approves miniature goats pilot program

Posted
Starting June 1, Thornton residents will be allowed to keep miniature goats in the backyards of single-family detached dwellings after Thornton City Council voted unanimously for the pilot program May 10. 
 
The program will end on Aug. 31, 2023, unless the council decides to extend it. There is a limit of 20 permits for the city, and for each of those permits, there can be no more than two goats; only vaccinated females and neutered males are allowed. 
 
There must be a minimum of 300 square feet of outdoor space with sturdy fencing.
 
Fifty to 120 square feet of indoor space is also required. That space must be covered and predator resistant with proper ventilation and located in the rear yard and set back a minimum of 5 feet from the property line. 
 
City Councilor Julia Marvin voiced concerns over how the program would impact surrounding neighbors. Dan Mauser, a lieutenant with the Thornton Police Department, said the city will inspect each permit applicant’s site plan prior to approval, and each goat owner needs to adhere to noise ordinances. 
 
Council would look at noise complaints at the end of the pilot program when they determine whether to extend it. 
 
City Councilor Tony Unrein asked if a homeowners association could overrule the program in their own bylaws. They can, Mauser said. 
 
Marvin said a resident came forward asking the city to allow goals on residential properties as emotional support animals. City Council directed staff to prepare this pilot program.
 
“One person was able to get this moving in the city,” she said. “I hope we see more things like this from residents in the future.”

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